REGULAMENT IPSC AIR ACTION (AIRSOFT IPSC)-EN Cap.1-6

In jos

REGULAMENT IPSC AIR ACTION (AIRSOFT IPSC)-EN Cap.1-6

Mesaj Scris de TEAMLEADER la data de 2/2/2010, 11:37 pm

INTERNATIONAL
PRACTICAL SHOOTING
CONFEDERATION
ACTION AIR COMPETITION RULES
JANUARY 2010 EDITION
International Practical Shooting Confederation
PO Box 972, Oakville, Ontario,
Canada L6J 9Z9
Tel: +1 905 849 6960 Fax: +1 905 842 4323
Email: rules@ipsc.org Web: www.ipsc.org
Copyright ©️ 2009 International Practical Shooting Confederation
IPSC Action Air Rules, January 2010 Edition ii
TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER 1 – Course Design
Page No.
1.1 General Principles………………………………………………………...………………………… 1
1.1.1 Safety..………………………………………………………………….…………….……. 1
1.1.2 Quality…..…………………………………………………………………………………. 1
1.1.3 Balance..…………………………………………………………………………………… 1
1.1.4 Diversity……………………………………………………………………………….…... 1
1.1.5 Freestyle….………………………………………………………………………..………. 1
1.1.6 Difficulty..…………………………………………………………………………………. 1
1.2 Types of Courses……………….…………………………………………………………………… 1
1.2.1 General Courses of Fire….…………………………………………………………...……. 1
1.2.2 Special Courses of Fire….……………………………………………………..…………... 2
1.2.3 Supplementary Courses of Fire……………………………………………………………. 2
1.3 IPSC Sanctioning………………………………………………………………………………….… 2
CHAPTER 2 – Course Construction and Modification
2.1 General Regulations..……………………………………………………...………………………... 3
2.1.1 Physical Construction…..……………………………………………….…………….…… 3
2.1.2 Safe Angles of Fire……….………………………………………………………………... 3
2.1.3 Minimum Distances……………………………………………………………………….. 3
2.1.4 Target Locations …….………………………………………………………………….…. 3
2.1.5 Range Surface………..……………………………………………………………..……… 3
2.1.6 Obstacles...…………………………………………………………………………………. 3
2.1.7 Common Firing Lines…...…………………………………………………...…………….. 3
2.1.8 Target Placement……....……………………………………………….…………….……. 3
2.1.9 Berms …………………….………………………………………………………………... 4
2.2 Course Construction Criteria………………………………………………………………………... 4
2.2.1 Fault Lines……………..…………………………………………….…………………….. 4
2.2.2 Obstacles ……….…....……………………………………………………………..……… 4
2.2.3 Barriers…...………………………………………………………………………………... 4
2.2.4 Tunnels ……………....……………………………………………………………..…….. 4
2.2.5 “Cooper” Tunnels..………………………………………………………………………… 4
2.2.6 Stage Props……..…....……………………………………………………………..……… 5
2.3 Modifications to Course Construction…………..………………………………………………….. 5
2.4 Safety Areas…………………….….…………………………………………………………...…… 5
2.5 Vendor Areas………………...….….…………………………………………………………...…... 6
CHAPTER 3 – Course Information
3.1 General Regulations……....………………………………………………………………………… 7
3.1.1 Published Courses of Fire…………………………………………………………..……… 7
3.1.2 Non-Published Courses of Fire…….……………………………………………………… 7
3.2 Written Stage Briefings……………..…………..…………………………………………………... 7
3.3 Local, Regional and National Rules.…………………………………………………………...…… 7
CHAPTER 4 – Range Equipment
4.1 Targets – General Principles………………………………………………………………………... 8
4.2 IPSC Approved Targets – Paper……………………………………………………………………. 8
4.3 IPSC Approved Targets –Rigid ……………………...…………………………………….............. 9
4.4 Frangible and Synthetic Targets ……………….………………………………………..………….. 9
4.5 Rearrangement of Range Equipment or Surface..……………………………………….………….. 9
4.6 Range Equipment Failure and Other Issues…...……………………………………………......…... 9
IPSC Action Air Rules, January 2010 Edition ii i
CHAPTER 5 – Competitor Equipment
5.1 Handguns …………………………………………………………………………………………… 10
5.2 Holsters and Other Competitor Equipment….……………………………………………………… 10
5.3 Appropriate Dress ……….………………………….………………………………………………. 11
5.4 Eye Protection……………………...…………………………………………………………….…. 12
5.5 Projectiles and Related Equipment….………….………………………………...…………………. 12
5.6 Power Factors………….…...………………………………………………...……………………... 12
5.7 Malfunctions – Competitor’s Equipment……..…….…………………………………………...….. 12
CHAPTER 6 – Match Structure
6.1 General Principles…….…………………………………………………………………………….. 14
6.1.1 String ……………………………………………………………………………………… 14
6.1.2 Standard Exercises……………….….…………………………………………………….. 14
6.1.3 Stage …………………………………………………………………………….………… 14
6.1.4 Match………………………………………………………………………………………. 14
6.1.5 Not applicable……..………………………………………………………………...……..
6.1.6 Not applicable ………………………………………………………..……………………
14
14
6.1.7 League …..………………………………………………………………………………… 14
6.1.8 Shoot-Off …………………………………….….…………………………………...……. 14
6.2 Match Divisions ….…………………….…...………………………………………………...……. 14
6.3 Match Categories …..…….………………….………………………………………………...……. 15
6.4 Regional Teams……………….………….…...………………………………………………...…... 15
6.5 Competitor Status and Credentials……..……...……...………………………………………...…... 15
6.6 Competitor Scheduling and Squadding …………………………………………………………….. 16
6.7 International Classification System (“ICS”) ………………………………………………….……. 16
CHAPTER 7 – Match Management
7.1 Match Officials….….……………………………………………………………………………….. 17
7.1.1 Range Officer ….…………………………….……………………………………………. 17
7.1.2 Chief Range Officer.…………….….……………………………………………………... 17
7.1.3 Stats Officer……………………………………………………………………………….. 17
7.1.4 Quartermaster ……………………………………………………………………………... 17
7.1.5 Range Master….…………………………………..…………………………………...…... 17
7.1.6 Match Director……………………………………………………………………………... 17
7.2 Discipline of Match Officials….……………...………………………………………………...…... 17
7.3 Appointment of Officials……………………………………………………………………………. 17
CHAPTER 8 – The Course of Fire
8.1 Handgun Ready Conditions….……………………………………………………………………… 18
8.2 Competitor Ready Condition ……………………………….……..………………………………... 18
8.3 Range Communication ……………………..……………..…………………………………...…… 19
8.3.1 “Load And Make Ready”………………………………………………………………….. 19
8.3.2 “Are You Ready”………………………………………………………………………….. 19
8.3.3 “Standby”………………………………………………………………………………….. 19
8.3.4 “Start Signal”…………………..………………………………………………………….. 19
8.3.5 “Stop”…………………..………………………………………………………………….. 19
8.3.6 “If You Are Finished, Unload And Show Clear”………...……………………………….. 19
8.3.7 “If Clear, Hammer Down, Holster”………………………………………………………... 19
8.3.8 “Range is Clear”……………………..…………………………………………………….. 20
8.4 Loading, Reloading or Unloading During a Course of Fire ………………………………………... 20
8.5 Movement…………..……………………………………………………………………………….. 20
8.6 Assistance or Interference ………………………………………………………………….………. 20
8.7 Sight Pictures and Range Inspection ……………………………………………………….………. 20
IPSC Action Air Rules, January 2010 Edition iv
CHAPTER 9 – Scoring
9.1 General Regulations……….….…………………………………………………………………….. 22
9.1.1 Approaching Targets………………………….…………………………………………… 22
9.1.2 Touching Targets…….………….….……………………………………………………… 22
9.1.3 Prematurely Patched Targets..……………………………………………………………... 22
9.1.4 Unrestored Targets…………..……..……………..…………………………………...…... 22
9.1.5 Impenetrable……………………………………………………………………………….. 22
9.1.6 Hard Cover …………….………………………………………………………………….. 22
9.1.7 Target Sticks……………………………………………………………………………….. 23
9.2 Scoring Methods…………………………………………………………………………………….. 23
9.3 Scoring Ties…………………………..……………………………………………………………... 24
9.4 Scoring and Penalty Values…………..……………………………………………………………... 24
9.5 Scoring Policy….……………………..…………………………………………………………….. 24
9.6 Score Verification and Challenge……..…………………………………………………………….. 25
9.7 Score Sheets……..……………..……..……………….…………………………………………….. 25
9.8 Scoring Responsibility………………………………………………………………………………. 26
9.9 Scoring of Moving Targets……………………………….…………………………………………. 26
9.10 Official Time ………………………………………………………………………………….……. 26
9.11 Scoring Programs …………………………………………………………………………….…….. 27
CHAPTER 10 – Penalties
10.1 Procedural Penalties – General Regulations ……………………………………………..…………. 28
10.2 Procedural Penalties – Specific Examples …………………………………………………………. 28
10.3 Match Disqualification – General Regulations….………………………………………………….. 29
10.4 Match Disqualification – Accidental Discharge ….………………………………………………… 29
10.5 Match Disqualification – Unsafe Gun Handling……………………………………………………. 30
10.6 Match Disqualification – Unsportsmanlike Conduct ………………………………………………. 31
10.7 Match Disqualification – Prohibited Substances……..……………………………………………... 31
CHAPTER 11 – Arbitration and Interpretation of Rules
11.1 General Principles …….….………………………………………………………………………… 32
11.1.1 Administration…….………………………….……………………………………………. 32
11.1.2 Access……….…….………………………….……………………………………………. 32
11.1.3 Appeals…………….………………………….…………………………………………… 32
11.1.4 Appeal to Committee..……………………….…………………………………………….. 32
11.1.5 Retain Evidence.….………………………….…………………………………………….. 32
11.1.6 Preparing the Appeal ……………………….……………………………………………... 32
11.1.7 Match Official’s Duty…..…………………….……………………………………………. 32
11.1.8 Match Director’s Duty….…………………….……………………………………………. 32
11.1.9 Arbitration Committee’s Duty….……………………………………………………….… 32
11.2 Composition of Committee..………………………………………………………………………... 32
11.2.1 Level III and Higher Matches ……………….….……………………………………….. 32
11.2.2 Level I and Level II Matches ……………….….………………………………………….. 32
11.3 Time Limits and Sequences...……………………..………………………………………………… 33
11.3.1 Time Limit for Arbitration Request …..…….…………………………………………….. 33
11.3.2 Decision Time Limit .……………………….…………………………………………….. 33
11.4 Fees ……………………..……………………..……………………………………………………. 33
11.4.1 Amount ……………………….……..…….………………………………………………. 33
11.4.2 Disbursement …….……………………….………………………………………………. 33
11.5 Rules of Procedure………..……………………..………………………………………………….. 33
11.5.1 Committee’s Duty and Procedure…………….…………………………………………… 33
11.5.2 Submissions…………………….…………….……………………………………………. 33
11.5.3 Hearing………………………….…………….…………………………………………… 33
11.5.4 Witnesses….…………………….…………….…………………………………………… 33
11.5.5 Questions…….………………….…………….…………………………………………… 33
11.5.6 Opinions…..…………………….…………….…………………………………………… 33
11.5.7 Inspect Area……………………….……………………………………………………… 33
11.5.8 Undue Influence.……………….…………….………………………………………….… 33
11.5.9 Deliberation ..……………………..………………………………………………………. 33
IPSC Action Air Rules, January 2010 Edition v
11.6 Verdict and Subsequent Action…..……………..…………………………………………………...
11.6.1 Committee Decision…………….…………….…………………………………………… 33
11.6.2 Implement Decision…………….…………….……………………………………………. 33
11.6.3 Decision is Final…..…………….…………….…………………………………………… 34
11.6.4 Minutes..…….………………….…………….……………………………………………. 34
11.7 Third Party Appeals ……..…..……………..……………………………………………………….. 34
11.8 Interpretation of Rules………..…..……………..………………………………………………….. 34
CHAPTER 12 – Miscellaneous Matters
12.1 Appendices …………………………………………………………………………….……….…... 35
12.2 Language ……………………………………………………………………………………….…... 35
12.3 Disclaimers …………………………………………………………………………….……….…... 35
12.4 Gender ………………………………………………………………………………………….…... 35
12.5 Glossary …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 35
12.6 Measurements ………………………………………………………………………………………. 36
Appendix A1 – IPSC Action Air Match Levels
Appendix A2 – IPSC Recognition
Appendix B1 – Target Presentation
Appendix B2 – IPSC Action Air Target
Appendix C1 – Calibration of IPSC Action Air Poppers
Appendix C2 – IPSC Action Air Popper Calibration Zones
Appendix C3 – IPSC Action Air Stop Plate
Appendix D1 – Action Air Open Division
Appendix D2 – Action Air Standard Division
Appendix D3 – Action Air Production Division
Appendix E1 – “J” Ladder for 16 Competitors
Appendix E2 – “J” Ladder for 8 Competitors
Appendix F1 – Magazine Measurement Procedure
Appendix F2 – Diagram of Equipment Position
IPSC Action Air Rules, January 2010 Edition 1
CHAPTER 1: Course Design
The following general principles of course design list the criteria, responsibilities and restrictions governing course
designers as the architects of the sport of IPSC shooting.
1.1 General Principles
1.1.1 Safety – IPSC Action Air matches must be designed, constructed and conducted with due consideration to
safety.
1.1.2 Quality – The value of an IPSC Action Air match is determined by the quality of the challenge presented in
the course design. Courses of fire must be designed primarily to test a competitor’s IPSC shooting skills, not
their physical abilities.
1.1.3 Balance – Accuracy, Power and Speed are equivalent elements of IPSC shooting, and are expressed in the
Latin words "Diligentia, Vis, Celeritas" (“DVC”). A properly balanced course of fire will depend largely
upon the nature of the challenges presented therein, however, courses must be designed, and IPSC matches
must be conducted in such a way, as to evaluate these elements equally. IPSC Action Air matches are exempt
from minimum power considerations (also see Rule 5.6.1).
1.1.4 Diversity – IPSC shooting challenges are diverse. While it is not necessary to construct new courses for each
match, no single course of fire must be repeated to allow its use to be considered a definitive measure of
IPSC shooting skills.
1.1.5 Freestyle – IPSC Action Air matches are freestyle. Competitors must be permitted to solve the challenge
presented in a freestyle manner, and to shoot targets on an "as and when visible" basis. After the start signal,
courses of fire must not require mandatory reloads nor dictate a shooting position, location or stance, except
as specified below. However, conditions may be created, and barriers or other physical limitations may be
constructed, to compel a competitor into shooting positions, locations or stances.
1.1.5.1 Level I and Level II matches are not required to comply strictly with the freestyle requirements or
projectile count limitations (see Section 1.2).
1.1.5.2 Standard Exercises and Classifiers may include mandatory reloads and may dictate a shooting
position, location or stance, however, mandatory reloads must never be required in other Long
Courses.
1.1.5.3 Standard Exercises and Classifiers may specify shooting with the strong hand or weak hand
unsupported. The specified hand must be used exclusively from the point stipulated for the
remainder of the string or stage.
1.1.6 Difficulty – IPSC Action Air matches present varied degrees of difficulty. No shooting challenge or time
limit may be appealed as being prohibitive. This does not apply to non-shooting challenges, which should
reasonably allow for differences in competitor's height and physical build.
1.2 Types of Courses
IPSC Action Air matches may contain the following types of courses of fire:
1.2.1 General Courses of Fire:
1.2.1.1 “Short Courses” must not require more than 9 projectiles to complete and no more than 2 shooting
locations.
1.2.1.2 "Medium Courses" must not require more than 16 projectiles to complete and no more than 3
shooting locations. Course design and construction must not require more than 9 scoring hits from
any single location or view, nor allow a competitor to shoot all targets in the course of fire from
any single location or view.
1.2.1.3 "Long Courses" must not require more than 32 projectiles to complete. Course design and
construction must not require more than 9 scoring hits from any single location or view, nor allow
a competitor to shoot all targets in the course of fire from any single location or view.
IPSC Action Air Rules, January 2010 Edition 2
1.2.1.4 The recommended balance for an IPSC Action Air match is a ratio of 3 Short Courses to 2
Medium Courses to 1 Long Course. Where possible, it is further recommended that no single
COF in a match represents more than 15% of the total match points available.
1.2.2 Special Courses of Fire:
1.2.2.1 “Standard Exercises” must not require more than 24 projectiles to complete. Component strings
must not require more than 6 projectiles (12 projectiles if a mandatory reload is specified).
1.2.2.2 Not applicable.
1.2.2.3 "Classifiers" – Courses of fire published by a Regional Directorate and/or IPSC, which are
available to competitors seeking a regional and/or international classification. Classifiers must be
set-up in accordance with these rules and be conducted strictly in accordance with the notes and
diagrams accompanying them. Results must be submitted to the publishing entity in the format
required (with the applicable fees, if any), in order for them to be recognized.
1.2.3 Supplementary Courses of Fire:
1.2.3.1 “Shoot-Off” must not require more than 9 projectiles to complete and must require 1 mandatory
reload.
1.3 IPSC Sanctioning
1.3.1 Match organizers wishing to receive IPSC sanctioning must comply with the general principles of course
design and course construction as well as all other current IPSC Rules and regulations relevant to the
discipline. Courses of fire that do not comply with these requirements will not be sanctioned, and must not
be publicized or announced as IPSC sanctioned matches.
1.3.2 The IPSC President, his delegate, or an officer of the Confederation (in that order) may withdraw IPSC
sanctioning from a match. Such action may be taken at any time where, in his or their opinion, a match
contravenes the purpose or spirit of the principles of course design or is in breach of any of the current IPSC
Rules or is likely to bring the sport of IPSC shooting into disrepute.
1.3.3 IPSC Action Air match level requirements and recommendations are specified in Appendix A1.
IPSC Action Air Rules, January 2010 Edition 3
CHAPTER 2: Course Construction and Modification
The following general regulations of course construction list the criteria, responsibilities and restrictions applicable to
courses of fire in IPSC Action Air matches. Course designers, host organizations and officials are governed by these
regulations.
2.1 General Regulations
2.1.1 Physical Construction – Safety considerations in the design, physical construction, and stated requirements
for any course of fire are the responsibility of the host organization subject to the approval of the Range
Master. Reasonable effort must be made to prevent injury to competitors, officials and spectators during the
match. Course design should prevent inadvertent unsafe actions wherever possible. Consideration must be
given to the operation of any course of fire to provide suitable access for officials supervising the
competitors.
2.1.2 Safe Angles of Fire – Courses of fire must always be constructed taking into account safe angles of fire.
Consideration must be given to safe target and frame construction and the angle of any possible ricochets.
Where appropriate the physical dimensions and suitability of backstops and side berms must be determined
as part of the construction process. Unless otherwise specified, the default maximum muzzle angle is 90
degrees in all directions, measured from the front of the competitor facing directly center downrange.
Violations are subject to Rule 10.5.2.
2.1.2.1 Subject to the direction and approval of the Regional Director, stage(s) or range specific muzzle
angles (reduced or increased) may be approved. Full details of the applicable angles must be
published in advance of the match and must be included in the written stage briefings (also see
Section 2.3). Violations are subject to Rule 10.5.2.
2.1.3 Minimum Distances – Whenever rigid targets or hard cover are used in a course of fire, precautions must be
taken so that competitors and Match Officials maintain a safe minimum distance from them while they are
being shot. Where possible, this should be done with physical barriers. Care should also be taken in respect
of props in the line of fire.
2.1.4 Target Locations – When a course is constructed to include target locations other than immediately
downrange, organizers and officials must protect or restrict surrounding areas to which competitors, officials
or spectators have access. Each competitor must be allowed to solve the competitive problem in his own way
and must not be hindered by being forced to act in any manner which might cause unsafe action. Targets
must be arranged so that shooting at them on an “as and when visible” basis will not cause competitors to
breach safe angles of fire.
2.1.5 Range Surface – Where possible, the range surface must be prepared prior to the match, and be kept
moderately clear of debris during the match, to provide reasonable safety for competitors and officials.
Consideration should be given to the possibility of inclement weather and competitor actions. Range
Officials may add gravel, sand or other materials to a deteriorated range surface at any time, and such range
maintenance actions may not be appealed by competitors.
2.1.6 Obstacles – Natural or created obstacles in a course of fire should reasonably allow for variations in
competitors' height and physical build and should be constructed to provide reasonable safety for all
competitors, Match Officials and spectators.
2.1.7 Common Firing Lines – Courses of fire where multiple competitors are required to fire simultaneously from
a common firing line (e.g. Standard Exercises, Shoot-Off), must provide a minimum of 1.5 meters of free
space between each competitor.
2.1.8 Target Placement – Care must be taken with the physical placement of a paper target to prevent a “shoot
through”.
2.1.8.1 Target placement should be clearly marked on the target stands for target replacement and target
stands should be securely fixed or their locations should be clearly marked on the range surface to
ensure consistency throughout the entire match. Furthermore, target types should be specified and
identified on the target frames or stands prior to the start of the match to ensure that a scoring
target is not interchanged with a no-shoot after the match has commenced.
IPSC Action Air Rules, January 2010 Edition 4
2.1.8.2 When paper and rigid targets are used in close proximity in a course of fire, care must be taken to
minimize the risk of ricochets from rigid targets.
2.1.8.3 When IPSC Action Air Poppers are used in a course of fire, care should be taken to ensure that the
location or foundation area is prepared to provide consistent operation throughout the match.
2.1.8.4 Static targets (i.e. those which are not activated) must not be presented at an angle greater than 90
degrees from the vertical.
2.1.9 All berms are “off limits” to all persons at all times, except when access to them is specifically permitted by a
Range Officer (see Rule 10.6.1).
2.2 Course Construction Criteria
During the construction of a course of fire, a variety of physical barriers may be used to restrict competitor movement
and to provide additional competitive challenges as follows:
2.2.1 Fault Lines - Competitor movement should preferably be restricted through the use of physical barriers,
however, the use of Fault Lines is permitted as follows:
2.2.1.1. To prevent unsafe and/or unrealistic charging at, or retreat from, targets;
2.2.1.2. To simulate the use of physical barriers and/or cover;
2.2.1.3. To define the boundaries of a general shooting area or part thereof.
2.2.1.4 Fault Lines should be constructed of wood or other suitable materials, they must rise at least 2
centimeters above ground level, they must be a minimum of 1 meter in length, and they should be
of a length sufficient to cover the areas most likely to be used by competitors. In any case, Fault
Lines are deemed to extend to infinity. Fault lines must be fixed firmly in place to ensure they
remain consistent throughout the match.
2.2.2 Obstacles – Courses of fire may include the use of barriers or major obstacles to be surmounted by
competitors. Obstacles used in this way must not exceed a height of 2 meters. Obstacles over 1 meter in
height must be supplied with scaling aids to assist competitors and must be constructed to provide for the
competitor’s safety in the following ways:
2.2.2.1 Obstacles must be firmly anchored and braced to provide adequate support when in use. Wherever
possible, unduly sharp or rough surfaces must be removed to reduce the possibility of injury to
competitors and/or Match Officials.
2.2.2.2 The descending side of any obstacle must be clear of obstructions or natural hazards.
2.2.2.3 Competitors must be allowed to test such obstacles before the course of fire and should be given a
short period to do so.
2.2.2.4 Competitors must not be required to holster their handgun before ascending these obstacles.
2.2.3 Barriers – Must be constructed in the following manner:
2.2.3.1 They must be high enough and strong enough to serve the intended purpose.
2.2.3.2 They should include Fault Lines projecting rearward at ground level from the side edges.
2.2.4 Tunnels – A tunnel that a competitor is required to enter or pass through must be constructed of suitable
material and to any length. However, sufficient ports must be provided to allow Match Officials to safely
monitor competitor action. Tunnel mouth edges must be prepared to minimize the possibility of injury to
competitors and Match Officials. Course designers must clearly designate the entrance and exit portions of
the tunnel as well as the parameters for shooting at any targets from within the tunnel (e.g. Fault Lines).
2.2.5 “Cooper” Tunnels – Are tunnels comprised of braced uprights supporting loose overhead materials (e.g.
wooden slats), which may be inadvertently dislodged by competitors (see Rule 10.2.5). These tunnels may
be constructed to any height, but overhead materials must not be heavy enough to cause injury if they fall.
IPSC Action Air Rules, January 2010 Edition 5
2.2.6 Stage Props – Where these items are intended to support a competitor in motion or while shooting targets,
they must be constructed with the safety of the competitor and Match Officials as a priority. Provisions must
be made to allow Match Officials to safely monitor and control competitor action at all times. Props must be
strong enough to withstand use by all competitors.
2.3 Modifications to Course Construction
2.3.1 Match Officials may, for any reason, modify the physical construction or stage procedure for a course of fire,
provided that such changes are approved in advance by the Range Master. Any such physical changes or
additions to a published course of fire should be completed before the stage begins.
2.3.2 All competitors must be notified of any such changes as soon as possible. As a minimum, they must be
notified by the official in charge of the course of fire during the squad briefing.
2.3.3 If the Range Master approves any such action after the match begins he must either:
2.3.3.1 Allow the course of fire to continue with the modification affecting only those competitors who
have not already completed the stage. If a competitor’s actions caused the change, that competitor
must be required to reshoot the altered course of fire; or
2.3.3.2 If possible, require all competitors to complete the course of fire as revised with all previous
attempts removed from the match scores.
2.3.3.3 A competitor who refuses to reshoot a course of fire, under this or any other Section, when so
ordered by a Range Official, will receive a zero score for that stage, irrespective of any previous
attempt.
2.3.4 If the Range Master (in consultation with the Match Director) determines that the physical or procedural
change results in a loss of competitive equity and it is impossible for all competitors to attempt the revised
stage, or if the stage has been rendered unsuitable or unworkable for any reason, that stage and all associated
competitor scores must be deleted from the match.
2.3.5 During inclement weather, the Range Master may order that paper targets be fitted with transparent
protective covers and/or overhead shelters, and this order is not subject to appeal by competitors (see Rule
6.6.1). Such items must be applied and remain fitted to all affected targets for the same period of time, until
the order is rescinded by the Range Master.
2.3.6 If the Range Master (in consultation with the Match Director) deems that climatic or other conditions have,
or are likely to, seriously affect the safety and/or conduct of a match, he may order that all shooting activities
be suspended, until he issues a "resume shooting" directive.
2.4 Safety Areas
The host organization is responsible for the construction and placement of a sufficient number of Safety Areas for the
match. They should be conveniently placed and easily identified with signs. Safety Areas should include a table with
the safe direction and boundaries clearly shown.
2.4.1 Competitors are permitted to use the Safety Areas for the activities stated below provided they remain within
the boundaries of the Safety Area and the firearm is pointed in a safe direction. Violations may be subject to
match disqualification (see Rules 10.5.1 & 10.5.12).
2.4.1.1 Casing, uncasing, and holstering unloaded firearms.
2.4.1.2 Practice the mounting, drawing, "dry-firing" and re-holstering of unloaded firearms.
2.4.1.3 Practice the insertion and removal of empty magazines and/or to cycle the action of a firearm.
2.4.1.4 Conduct inspections, stripping, cleaning, repairs and maintenance of firearms, component parts
and other accessories.
2.4.2 Projectiles and loaded magazines must not be handled (nor can propellant gas be released) in a Safety Area
under any circumstances (see Rule 10.5.12).
IPSC Action Air Rules, January 2010 Edition 6
2.5 Vendor Areas
2.5.1 Vendors (i.e. individuals, corporations and other entities displaying or selling merchandise at an IPSC Action
Air match) are solely responsible for the safe handling and security of their products, and ensuring they are
displayed in a condition that must not endanger any person. Assembled firearms and their magazines must
be totally devoid of projectiles.
2.5.2 The Range Master (in consultation with the Match Director) must clearly delineate the vendor area, and he
may issue “Acceptable Practice Guidelines” to all vendors, who are responsible for their implementation in
respect of their own merchandise.
2.5.3 Competitors may handle unloaded vendor's firearms while remaining wholly within the vendor areas,
provided reasonable care is taken to ensure that the muzzle is not pointed at any person while being handled.
2.5.4 Competitors must not draw or re-holster their competition firearms in the vendor area (see Rule 10.5.1).
Competitors seeking gunsmithing services for their competition firearms must firstly place them in a gun bag
or gun case, in a designated safety area, before passing them to a vendor in the vendor area.
IPSC Action Air Rules, January 2010 Edition 7
CHAPTER 3: Course Information
3.1 General Regulations
The competitor is always responsible to safely fulfil the requirements of a course of fire but can only reasonably be
expected to do so after verbally or physically receiving the written stage briefing, which must adequately explain the
requirements to the competitors. Course information can be broadly divided into the following types:
3.1.1 Published Courses of Fire – Registered competitors and/or their Regional Directorates must be provided with
the same course of fire information, within the same notice period, in advance of the match. The information
may be provided by physical or electronic means, or by reference to a website (also see Section 2.3).
3.1.2 Non-Published Course of Fire – Same as Rule 3.1.1 except that the details for the course of fire are not
published beforehand. The stage instructions are provided in the written stage briefing.
3.2 Written Stage Briefings:
3.2.1 A written stage briefing approved by the Range Master must be posted at each course of fire prior to
commencement of the match. This briefing will take precedence over any course of fire information
published or otherwise communicated to competitors in advance of the match, and it must provide the
following minimum information:
avatar
TEAMLEADER
Admin
Admin

Mesaje : 677
Data de inscriere : 10/09/2009
Varsta : 51
Localizare : Cluj-Napoca

http://daciarex.ro

Sus In jos

Sus


 
Permisiunile acestui forum:
Nu puteti raspunde la subiectele acestui forum